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DISEASES

Sarcoidosis
 
 

According to a recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimate, 90% of cells in the human body are bacterial, fungal, or otherwise non-human.1 Although many have concluded that bacteria surely enjoy a commensal relationship with their human hosts, only a fraction of the human microbiota has been characterized, much less identified. The sheer number of non-human genes represented by the human microbiota – there are millions in our “extended genome”2 compared to the nearly 23,000 in the human genome – implies we have just begun to fathom the full extent to which bacteria work to facilitate their own survival.

The NIH’s ongoing initiative, the Human Microbiome Project, aspires to catalog the human microbiome, also referred to as the human metagenome. Emerging insights from environmental sampling studies have shown, for example, that in vitro based methods for culturing bacteria have drastically underrepresented the size and diversity of bacterial populations. One environmental sample of human hands found 100 times more species than had previously been detected using purely culture-based methods. Another study which also employed high throughput genomic sequencing discovered high numbers of hydrothermal vent eubacteria on prosthetic hip joints, a species once thought only to persist in the depths of the ocean.

Horizontal gene transfer

Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), sometimes referred to as lateral gene transfer, is any process in which a bacterium inserts genetic material into the genomes of other pathogens or into the genome of its host. HGT represents a substantial blow to the validity of Koch’s postulates, which state that any given infectious disease is caused by a single discrete and well-defined pathogen.

“Increasingly, studies of genes and genomes are indicating that considerable horizontal gene transfer has occurred between bacteria.”

James Lake, Molecular Biology Institute at the University of California

In fact, due to increasing evidence suggesting the importance of the phenomenon in organisms that cause disease, molecular biologists such as Peter Gogarten at the University of Connecticut have described horizontal gene transfer as “a new paradigm for biology.”

Gorgarten insists that horizontal gene transfer is “more frequent than most biologists could even imagine a decade ago” and that this reality turns the idea that we can classify organisms in a simple “tree of life” on its head.

Instead Gogarten suggests that biologists use the metaphor of a mosaic to describe the different histories combined in individual genomes and use the metaphor of a net to visualize the rich exchange of DNA among microbes.